Pediatric Ophthalmology | M. Edward Wilson • Richard A. Saunders • Rupal H. Trivedi (Eds.)

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Автор: M. Edward Wilson, Richard A. Saunders, Rupal H. Trivedi (Eds.)

Год: 2009

Издательство: Springer

Формат: PDF

Качество: E-Book

Количество страниц: 487

Описание:

There are encyclopedic reference books available in many sub-specialty areas of eye care, including pediatric ophthalmology. These large texts are most valuable when a clinician needs to quickly find a differential diagnosis, a list of treatment options, or the findings to look for when a particular syndrome is suspected.

With Pediatric Ophthalmology: Current Thought and a Practical Guide, we have not attempted to match the breadth of those exhaustive reference texts. Instead, we bring to the pediatric-oriented ophthalmologists a book they will want to read cover-tocover.

We strived for enough depth and perspective in each chapter so that the book
could be considered core reading for trainees and practitioners alike.

When I first met with Marion Philipp, Senior Editor at Springer, to discuss this project, I told her that this book would be the most well-read book in the pediatric ophthalmology field because each chapter would be written by a respected thoughtleader who could give a concise overview of the most current thought and practice recommendations for that subject.

I told her that each author would be recognized by the reader as one of the go-to people for that subject. I invited a true “who’s who” in pediatric ophthalmology. By being very persistent and not taking “no” for an answer, I was successful in getting the most sought-after writers.

Once committed, each has delivered exactly what I had hoped for. The results are chapters that display the perspective of the author’s years of experience combined with the practicality needed for the busy clinician. I expect that the readers will absorb each chapter in its entirety instead of using it only to look up facts and treatments.

Each Chapter starts with a bulleted list of “Core Messages” and ends with “Take Home Pearls”. The best references are included at the end of each chapter but no attempt is made to include comprehensive lists of historical references. I am thankful for this format, suggested by Springer, because it fits well with the intended scope and purpose of this work.

My Storm Eye Institute editorial partners have, more than anyone, made this project possible. Rupal Trivedi, MD, MSCR, has been with us at Storm Eye for nearly a decade. She began as a post-doctoral fellow, first with David Apple, MD and then with me. She received a Masters in Clinical Research degree here at MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina) and quickly became the go-to mentor for nearly every research project developed by one of our Ophthalmology residents or fellows.

Her expertise in study design and data management is really remarkable. For this book, her attention to detail and her command of the literature gave us what we needed to bring this book to completion. The selection of index headings and sub-headings for the entire book were painstakingly selected by Dr. Trivedi singlehandedly.

Credit for this book’s uniformity of style and format goes in large part to Dr. Richard Saunders. It took someone with Rick’s reputation and seniority to accomplish this task. His command of written English surpasses anything that I have encountered in the field of ophthalmology, perhaps in part because he was raised by two professional editors: his father served as Executive Editor for Forbes Magazine for 20+ years; his mother was Director of Publications for the National Association of Social Workers. He gently nudged many of the authors towards the uniform content and style we had envisioned. Rick was also the first pediatric ophthalmologist in South Carolina and among the first pediatric ophthalmologists in the USA to be awarded an endowed professorship. He is respected as a leader well beyond the bounds of the state of South Carolina. His knowledge and experience are superb, especially with regard to complex strabismus and retinopathy of prematurity.
I have enjoyed working with the dedicated team at Springer. Marion Philipp, Senior Editor for Clinical Medicine was mentioned earlier. She initiated the project and shepherded it through a successful completion. Martina Himberger, Desk Editor, was in constant communication with us and gave the project her full support. I know she has many projects but she made us feel as though we were her first and only concern. Le-tex publishing services completed the copyediting (thanks to Ute Noatsch and Annegret Krap) and production editing (thanks to Petra Moews) work with precision and speed. The entire team assembled at Springer was first-rate and I thank them personally.

My final thanks must go to my family for supporting me and always trying to keep me grounded and balanced. They (my family) come first, no matter how exciting the world of ophthalmology becomes. My wife, Donna, is the “CEO” of our household, making it possible for me to run a large academic department and the Storm Eye Institute. She is an expert at motivating me to be my best for the patients I serve and yet reminding me when it is time to let it go and spend time at home.

She has taught me that only with balance can there be long-lasting meaningful success. My son, Leland, has taught me more about being a good doctor than anyone in my formal education. Despite optic nerve damage and cerebral palsy, he has a way of bringing out a smile in everyone he meets. He believes, correctly, that everyone would be healthier if they had at least one hug every day.

For those in Pediatric Ophthalmology, I urge you to commit to lifelong learning, challenge conventional wisdom, and have fun. We have the privilege to take care of the eyes of children who will lead the world through many future crises. Do your job well and inspire others to follow. Don’t believe the old adage that nothing new ever comes out of Pediatric Ophthalmology. The authors of the chapters in this book believe that with constant innovation and high quality clinical investigations tempered by a careful “do-no-harm” motto, the field of Pediatric Ophthalmology will be constantly evolving.

M. Edward Wilson, MD


Contents


1 The Art and Science of Examining a Child
M. Edward Wilson

2 Refractive Error in Children
Constance E. West

3 Refractive Surgery in Children
Evelyn A. Paysse, Ashvini K. Reddy and Mitchell P. Weikert

4 Amblyopia
David K. Wallace

5 Worldwide Causes of Blindness in Children
Clare Gilbert

6 Screening for Pediatric Ophthalmologic Disorders
Sean P. Donahue

7 Evaluation of the Apparently Blind Child
William V. Good and Taliva D. Martin

8 Comitant Esotropia
Edward L. Raah

9 Exotropic Deviations
Burton J. Kushner

10 Orthoptic Evaluation and Treatment
Kyle Arnoldi

11 Principles and Management of Complex Strabismus
Irene H. L ltd wig

12 Dissociated Deviations
M. Edward Wilson

13 A and V Patterns
David A. Plager

14 General Principles in the Surgical Treatment of Paralytic Strabismus
Edward G. Buckley

15 Diagnosis and Surgical Management of Ocular Motility Syndromes
Ronald G.W. Teed and Richard A. Saunders

16 Adjustable Sutures in Strabismus Surgery
David G. Hunter, R. Scott Dingeman and Bharti R. Nihalani

17 Complications of Strabismus Surgery
Rudolph S. Wagner

18 Nystagmus in Infancy and Childhood
Richard W. Hertle

19 Pediatric Eyelid Disorders
Forrest J. Ellis

20 Pediatric Lacrimal Disorders
Gregg T. Lueder

21 Congenital Ocular Malformations
Aleksandra V. Rachitskaya and Elias I. Trahoulsi

22 Pediatric Cataract: Preoperative Issues and Considerations
Rupal H. Trivedi and M. Edward Wilson

23 Pediatric Cataract Surgery: Operative and Postoperative Issues
M. Edward Wilson and Rupal И. Trivedi

24 Glaucoma in Infancy and Early Childhood
Sharon F. Freedman and Suzanne C. Johnston

25 Retinopathy of Prematurity
David K. Coats and Ashvini K. Reddv

26 Pediatric Retinal Disorders
Newman J. Sund and Antonio Capone Jr

27 Pediatric Ocular Tumors and Simulating Lesions
Matthew W Wilson

28 The Challenges of Pediatric Uveitis
John D. Sheppard, Jeffrey Davis and Avi Meier

29 Common Conditions Affecting the External Eye
Cintia F. Gomi and David B. Granet

30 Pediatric Low Vision
Linda Lawrence and M. Edward Wilson

31 Pediatric Ocular Trauma
Scott R. Lambert and Amy K. Hutchinson

Subject Index




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